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Stephanie O. Joy, Esq.

Making Your Social Security Disability Claim
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Only Priority
Phone:  (201) 317-0610    Fax:  (888) 550-7517    Email:  stephaniejoy@myssicase.com      URL:  http://MySsiCase.com

If you suffer from disabling Schizophrenia and can no longer work a full
time work week, I would be happy to help you obtain your rightful
Disability Benefits. You may be eligible for Social Security Disability
benefits, even if you will eventually, and hopefully, recover.  My SS work
deals in large part with Schizophrenia and other mental illness, and I
would be honored to assist you.

Start by filling out the FREE online
Social Security Disability Claim Evaluation Form,
calling me at 201-317-0610 or emailing me at
stephaniejoy@myssicase.com.
Schizophrenia
and women with equal frequency. People suffering from schizophrenia may also be
diagnosed with Depression, BiPolar Disorder or Psychosis and may have the
following symptoms:

  • Delusions
  • False personal beliefs held with conviction in spite of reason or evidence to
    the contrary, not explained by that person's cultural context
  • Hallucinations
  • Perceptions (can be sound, sight, touch, smell, or taste) that occur in the
    absence of an actual external stimulus (Auditory hallucinations, those of
    voice or other sounds, are the most common type of hallucinations in
    schizophrenia.)
  • Disorganized thoughts and behaviors
  • Disorganized speech
  • Catatonic behavior, in which the affected person's body may be rigid and
    the person may be unresponsive

The term schizophrenia is Greek in origin, and in the Greek meant "split mind."
This is not an accurate medical term. In Western culture, some people have come
to believe that schizophrenia refers to a split-personality disorder. These are two
very different disorders, and people with schizophrenia do not have separate
personalities.

Schizophrenia and other mental health disorders have fairly strict criteria for
diagnosis. Time of onset as well as length and characteristics of symptoms are all
factors. The active symptoms of schizophrenia must be present at least 6 months,
or only 1 month if treated.

Who is affected? Estimates of how many people are diagnosed with this disorder
vary. The illness affects about 1% of the population. More than 2 million Americans
suffer from schizophrenia at any given time, and 100,000-200,000 people are
newly diagnosed every year. Fifty percent of people in hospital psychiatric care
have schizophrenia. Schizophrenia is usually diagnosed in people aged 17-35
years.

The illness appears earlier in men (in the late teens or early twenties) than in
women (who are affected in the twenties to early thirties). Many of them are
disabled. They may not be able to hold down jobs or even perform tasks as simple
as conversations. (If you believe that you or someone you love, are unable to work
due to the symptoms of schizophrenia or another mental health disorder, we can
help you obtain Social Security Disability benefits.) Some may be so incapacitated
that they are unable to do activities most people take for granted, such as
showering or preparing a meal. Many are homeless. Some recover enough to live
a life relatively free from assistance.

The causes of schizophrenia are not known. However, an interplay of genetic,
biological, environmental, and psychological factors are thought to be involved.
We do not yet understand all the causes and other issues involved, but current
research is making steady progress towards elucidating and defining causes of
schizophrenia. In biological models of schizophrenia, genetic (familial)
predisposition, infectious agents, allergies, and disturbances in metabolism have
all been investigated. Schizophrenia is known to run in families. Thus, the risk of
illness in an identical twin of a person with schizophrenia is 40-50%. A child of a
parent suffering from schizophrenia has a 10% chance of developing the illness.
The risk of schizophrenia in the general population is about 1%.

The current concept is that multiple genes are involved in the development of
schizophrenia and that factors such as prenatal (intrauterine), perinatal, and
nonspecific stressors are involved in creating a disposition or vulnerability to
develop the illness. Neurotransmitters (chemicals allowing the communication
between nerve cells) have also been implicated in the development of
schizophrenia. The list of neurotransmitters under scrutiny is long, but special
attention has been given to dopamine, serotonin, and glutamate. Also, recent
studies have identified subtle changes in brain structure and function, indicating
that, at least in part, schizophrenia could be a disorder of the development of the
brain.

It is important for doctors to investigate all reasonable medical causes for any
acute change in someone’s mental health or behavior. Sometimes a medical
condition that might be treated easily, if diagnosed, is responsible for symptoms
that resemble those of schizophrenia. If you or a loved on suffer from debilitating
schizophrenia and are unable to work and support yourself, help in obtaining
federal social security disability benefits is available to you. There is no fee unless
you win cash benefits and even then, the Social Security Administration will usually
pay same directly from your won back benefits. Fill out the FREE Disability
Evaluation Form to get assistance from Disability Attorney Stephanie O. Joy, Esq.,
right away. Or call 570-234-0171 or email
SsiHelp@ptd.net.
About Schizophrenia:
& Social Security Disability
Attorney Stephanie Joy (c.2011)
"Combining the practice of SS law with
Compassion and Communication"
TM